How Bojack Horseman Does ‘Politically Correct’ Humour Right

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‘Political correctness’ is an ugly term to a lot of people. To them it represents a threat our ability to speak honestly about challenging things, a silencing of dialogues that can help us become stronger and learn new things, a fear driven act of censorship even. Especially when it comes to comedy, people see it as a threat to creativity itself. But let me offer another idea: political correctness has the power to make comedy not only more creative but actually funnier.

And you know who agrees with me? Bojack Horseman creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg. No kidding, you can read his exact words right here. You know who also agrees with me? Mr. Peanutbutter himself Paul F. Tompkins. So how does a dark gritty comedy like Bojack Horseman manage to be surrounded by such sensitive people? The short answer is that ‘political correctness’ isn’t about not saying things. It’s about questioning how and why you’re saying them. And Bojack Horseman is a stellar show when it comes to self-questioning.

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The Beauty and Sadness of Bojack Horseman’s ‘Fish Out of Water’

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I have no hesitation when saying there has never been a better time to be a fan of western animated television. More things have grown on me, blown my expectations away, touched me and brought me to tears from this medium than ever before. But none with the sheer emotional gravitas of Bojack Horseman. That a sneering pop culture satire built around so many unlikeable individuals could carry this much sincerity and vulnerability itself is a feat well beyond many of its peers, but that it never lets go of that dignified seriousness and takes it into so many dark and extraordinary places is what puts it at the apex of its craft. ‘Fish Out of Water’ is at once one of the most ambitious and most tragic episodes of the series. It’s wonderful, it’s funny, it’s experimental, it’s deeply painful, it’s Bojack Horseman.

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“But it does get easier” – Bojack Horseman and Happiness

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The second season of Bojack Horseman ends quietly with titular character Bojack going on a jog up a hill. His life, for lack of a better term, seems like an inescapable dumpster fire; and this early step in trying once more to turn it around seems physically impossible. He proclaims running to be terrible and everything to be the worst, and then he drops to the ground in exhaustion. A stranger approaches him and gives him a piece of advice:

“It gets easier. Every day it gets a little easier. But you gotta do it every day. That’s the hard part. But it does get easier”

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